Barulad

Family • Sterculiaceae - Waltheria americana Linn. - SLEEPY MORNING - He ta cao


Scientific names

Waltheria americana Linn.
Waltheria indica Linn.
Waltheria elliptica

Common names

Barulad (Ilk.)
Kanding-kanding (C. Bis.)
Sleepy morning (Engl.)
Velvet leaf (Engl.)
Monkey bush (Engl.)
He ta cao (Chin.)

barulad

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings

(1) Inhibitory effects of the flavonoids isolated from Waltheria indica on the production of NO, TNF-alpha and IL-12 in activated macrophages / Rao YK, Fang SH, Tzeng YM / Biol Pharm Bull. 2005 May;28(5):912-5.

(2) EVALUATION OF 17 MEDICINAL PLANTS FROM NORTHERN CÔTE D’IVOIRE FOR THEIR IN VITRO ACTIVITY AGAINST STREPTOCOCCUS PNEUMONIAE / W Mamidou Kone, K Kamanzi Atindehou et al / Koné et al..Afr. J. Trad. CAM (2007) 4 (1): 17 – 22

(3) Waltheria indica L / Prelude Medicinal Plants Database

(4) Antifungal flavones from W. americana / Thesis / Carmel A Cruz / De La Salle University

barulad2Botany
Barulad is an erect, more or less branched, hairy, shrubby or half woody plant, 0.5 to 1.5 meters high. Leaves are oblong-ovate or oblong, 3.5 to 9 centimeters long, rounded or blunt at the tip, slightly heart-shaped at the base, with toothed margins. Flowers are yellow, sweet-scented, about 5 millimeters long, borne in dense, shortly peduncled fascicles at the axils of the leaves.

Distribution
– A common weed in dry places in the settled areas of the Philippines at low and medium altitudes.
– Pantropic.

Constituents
– Yields mucilage, tannin and sugar; no alkaloid.
– Yields

Properties
– Plant considered astringent.
– Mucilaginous.
– Considered emollient, febrifuge, anti-inflammatory, antifungal, antisyphilitic, aphrodisiac, abortifacient.
– Root considered purgative.


barulad3Parts used

Roots, leaves.

Uses 
Folkloric
– In the Philippines, used as febrifuge and as antisyphilitic.
– In Tamaulipas,decoction used as remedy for eruptions of the skin and for washing wounds.
– Decoction given to infants to drink or to sniff and inhale, at teething or at birth.
– In Togo and Yoruba, infusion is given as drink and wash, to strengthen a child’s resistance against fevers.
– Among the Hausas. used as purgative; decoction used as syphilis prevention or immunity.
– Used by farmers as a restorative drink during the labors of harvesting.
– In Togo, spoonful of the pulverized plant in hot water, taken morning and evening as cough medicine.
– In Surinam, used as febrifuge.
– In the Gold Coast, used as abortifacient, but in South Africa, root used as remedy for sterility and as astringent for internal hemorrhages.
– In the Antilles, used as emollient.
– In West Africa, decoction of roots and leaves, used for washing wounds. In the Ivory Coast, decoction of roots also used as aphrodisiac.
– In Nigeria, decoction of roots or chewing of fresh roots used for internal hemorrhage.

Others
Cosmetics: Extract has reported use in several cosmetic products – moisturizers, skin lightening, anti-aging.

Study Findings
• Anti-Inflammatory / Flavonoids: Study isolated three flavonoids from the whole plant of Waltheria indica. The flavonoids showed significant dose-dependent inhibition of the production of inflammatory mediator NO, cytokines (TNF-a) and interleukin (IL-12) in activated macrophages, without displaying cytotoxicity. Findings support the use of W indica for inflammatory diseases.
• Anti-Pneumococcal: Study of 221 crude extracts from 17 species showed 7 from 6 plants, including Waltheria indica, to have promising in vitro bactericidal activity against Pneumococcus, including penicillin-resistant strains. Results support its traditional use in the treatment of pneumococcal infections.
• Anti-Plasmodial: In a study of 13 extracts from 8 different species, five species, including W indica (roots and aerial parts) demonstrated moderate antiplasmodial activity.
• Flavones / Antifungal: Study yielded two flavones, 5,2,5’trihydroxy-3,7,4′ trimethoxyflavone and 5,2’dihydroxy-3,7,4′,5′ tetramethoxyflavone. Both were exclusively very active against fungal microorganisms: Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, and T. mentagrophytes.

Availability
Wild-crafted.
Tinctures and extracts in the cybermarket.