Bias-bias

Family • Commelinaceae - Commelina benghalensis Linn. - BENGHAL DAYFLOWER - Fan bao cao


Scientific names

Commelina benghalensis Linn.
Commelina polygama Blanco
Commelina cavaleriei H. Leveille

Common names

Alibangon (Tag.) Sambilau (Bis.)
Bias-bias (Tag., Pamp.) Uligbongon (Tag.)
Kabilau (Bis.) Benghal dayflower (Engl.)
Kuhasi (Iv.) Tropical spiderwort (Engl.)
Kulkul-lasi (Ilk.) Whiskered commelina (Engl.)
Sabilau (Bis.) Fan bao cao (Chin.)

bias-bias

Botany
Bias-bias is a perennial mucilaginous plant, slender, creeping or ascending, branched, up to 70 cm and usually pubescent. The stems root at the nodes. Leaves are oval, 4 to 7 cm long and pointed at both ends. The spathes are 1 to 3 together, green, funnel-shaped, compressed, about 1.5 cm long and wide. The flowers are blue, with long stalks in antheis, fascicled, several in each spathe, with the petal 3 to 4 mm long. Capsules are 4 to 5 mm long.

Distribution
In open grasslands and waste places in the settled areas, at low and medium altitudes.

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings

(1) ETHNOVETERINARY MEDICAL TRADITIONS AND METHODOLOGY FOR THEIR DOCUMENTATION, ASSESSMENT AND PROMOTION / M N B Nair / Foundation for Revitalisation of Local Health Traditions

(2) Kaua-kaini (Commelina benghalensis Linn.) / Pankaj Oudhia

(3) Analgesic Activity of the Different Fractions of the Aerial Parts of Commelina benghalensis Linn / S M Raquibul Hasan et al / Int. J. Pharmacol., 6: 63-67. / DOI: 10.3923/ijp.2010.63.67

(4) Pharmacognostic and Phytochemical Analysis of Commelina benghalensis L. / Ibrahim J, Ajaegbu V et al / Ethnobotanical Leaflets 14: 610-15. 2010.

(5) Antibacterial activity of different fractions of Commelina benghalensis L. / Mohammad A A Khan, Mohammad T Islam et al / Der Pharmacia Sinica, 2011, 2 (2): 320-326

(6) WIL-2 NS LYMPHOMA CELL LINE SHOW APOPTOTIC FEATURES WHEN TREATED WITH TRADITIONAL MEDICINE COMMELINA BENGHALESIS / M P Mokgotho, P Masoko et al / African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative medicines (AJTCAM), ABSTRACTS OF THE WORLD CONGRESS ON MEDICINAL AND AROMATIC PLANTS, CAPE TOWN NOVEMBER 2008

bias-bias2Constituents
– Anthocyanins, dammarane triterpene, sterols, campesterol.
– Phytochemical screening yielded phlobatannins, carbohydrates, tannins, glycosides, volatile oils, resins, balsams, flavonoids and saponins.

Properties
Considered febrifugal, anti-inflammatory, demulcent, emollient, hypotensive, CNS depressant, diuretic, refrigerant, laxative and astringent.

Part utilized
Entire plant.

Uses
Nutrition
Leaves are edible.
A famine food in India.

bias-bias3Folkloric
No reported folkloric medicinal use in the Philippines.
The entire plant, in decoction, is used as an emollient collyrium.
Also used to combat strangury.
In Cameroon, stem used for probing wounds.
In Kenya, used in conjunctival problems associated with measles.
In India, used in treatment of leprosy and nervous system disorders. Also, reported use for mouth thrush, conjunctival inflammation, psychosis, epilepsy, insanity and exophthalmia.
In China, used as diuretic, febrifuge and anti-inflammatory.
In Africa and India, leaves and stems cooked as vegetables.
In Southern Africa, used to combat infertility.
In Bangladesh , used for otitis media, suppurative sores, snakebites, swelling and burns. Also used for conjunctivitis, cataracts, night blindness, pain (headaches and toothaches), skin diseases (eczema, abscesses, acne, scabies, warts), respiratory tract disorders.
Ethnoveterinary
• Mastitis: External application of poultice of stems of Wattakaka volubilis and leaves of Commelina benghalensis ovber the affected udder.
Others
• Grazing feed for goats with its high moisture and protein content; in Africa and India, used as feed for livestock.

bias-bias4Study Findings
• Carotenoid Composition: In a study to determine the carotenoid compositionn of green leafy vegetable, Chenopodium album, C benghalensis and Solanum nigrum were found to contain higher levels of both lutein and beta carotene.
• Antibacterial: Studies have shown antibacterial activity agaiinst Pseudomonas, Staphylococcus, E coli and B subtilis and supports its use in formulations for ethnoveterianry use for mastitis. Among crude extracts of C. benghalensis, the diethyl etheric extract was highly active against all the 10 bacteria species tested. The results offer scientific basis for the traditional use of the plant against infection by burns and wounds. In a study evaluating whole and dried plant extracts for antimicrobial activity, dried plant material yielded greater amounts of extractives. The ethanol extracts were superior to the aqueous extracts. The ethanolic extracts showed activity against C albicans, E coli, S aureus comparable to nystatin and gentamicin.
• Analgesic: Study showed C benghalensis possesses significant analgesic action probably through inhibition of prostaglandin synthesis, antioxidant activity and a central analgesic mechanism. Results provide a scientific basis for it folkloric use for pain treatment.
• Anti-Cancer: Study showed the methanolic extract of CB contains bioactive compounds that may be beneficial in the treatment of malignant growths, probably through an antineoplastic activity consequent to dysregulated expression of apoptosis-responsive genes.
• Antiproliferative / Anti-Lymphoma: Study showed C. benghalensis has anti-proliferation properties against Wil-2NS lymphoma cells.

Availability
Wild-crafted.