Dilang-butiki

Family • Rubiaceae - Dentella repens (Linn.) Forst. - CREEPING DENTELLA - Xiao ya cao

Scientific names

Oldenlandia repens (Linn.)
Dentella repens (Linn.) Forst.

Common names

Dilang-butiki (Tag.)
Creeping lickstoop (Engl.)
Creeping dentella (Engl.)
Xiao ya cao (Chin.)

Dilang-butiki

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings

(1) Medicinal weeds of crop fields and role of women in rural health and hygiene in Nalbari district, Assam / D K Bhattacharjya, P C Borah / Indian Journ of Traditional Knowledge, Vol 7(3), July 2008, pp 501-504

(2) Dentella repens / GLOBinMed

Dilang-butiki2

Botany
Dilang-butiki is a prostrate, nearly or quite smooth, somewhat succulent, slender, branched, herbaceous annual weed, rooting at the nodes. Leaves are narrowly oblong-obovate to narrowly elliptic, and 1 centimeter long or less. Flowers are stalkless, white, about 2 millimeters long, and borne singly in the axils of the leaves. Fruit is an indehiscent capsule, ovoid, about 4 millimeters long, crowned by the sepal, usually densely hairy and many seeded. Seeds are small, angular, reticulate and dark brown.

Distribution
– A weed in open, waste places in and about towns at low and medium altitudes throughout the Philippines.
– Introduced from Mexico.
– Also occurs in India to southern China and through Malaya to Australia and Polynesia.

Parts used
Roots.

Uses
Folkloric
– Malays used the plant for poulticing sores.
– In the Nalbari district, Assam, crushed warm leaf is given for loose motion in infants. Plant juice is taken once daily for blood pressure.

Study Findings
• Smooth Muscle Activities: Of 27 plants studied, 48% demonstrated smooth muscle relaxant activity and 17% contraction. The bark of Hedyotis congesta demonstrated the most potent contraction.

Availability
Wild-crafted.