Indian rubber vine

Family • Family - Cryptostegia grandiflora (Roxb.) R. Br. - PURPLE ALLAMANDA


Scientific names

Cryptostegia grandiflora (Roxb.) R. Br.
Nerium grandiflora Roxb.

Common names

Indian rubber vine (Engl.)
Purple allamanda (Engl.)

Indian rubber vine

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings

(1) Antiviral activity of medicinal plants of Nilgiris / P Vijayan et al / Indian J Med Res 120, July 2004, pp 24-29

(2) Cardiac glycosides from Cryptostegia grandiflora / M S Kamel , M H Assaf et al / Phytochemistry 58 (2001) 537–542

(3) Studies on the antibacterial potential of Cryptostegia grandiflora R. BR. (Asclepiadaceae) extract / Pulok K Mukherjee, R Gunasekhran et al / Phytotherapy Research, Volume 13 Issue 1, Pages 70 – 72 / Published Online: 15 Feb 1999

(4) PHYTOCHEMICAL STUDY OF FLOWERS AND LATEX OF CRYPTOSTEGIA GRANDIFLORA R.BR. CULTIVATED IN EGYPT / S. M. El Zalabani, E. A. Abdel Sattar, F. I. Fathy and N. G. Shehab

Indian rubber vine2
Botany
Cryptostegia grandiflora is a stout, woody vine. Leaves are oblong-ovate to elliptic-ovate, 6 to 10 centimeters long, pointed at the tip, rounded at the base. Cymes are short. Sepals are green, about 8 millimeters long. Corolla is pale purple, about 4 centimeters long, and often wider than it is long. Woody follicles are 10 to 12 centimeters long.

Distribution
– Recent introduction to the Philippines.
– Planted for ornamental purposes.
– Now, pantropic.
– Native of India.

Indian rubber vine3

Constituents
– Phytochemical studies of flowers yielded two cardenolides, oleandrigenin and gitoxigenin, as well as, two flavonoid glycosides, hyperoside and astragalin, and their aglycones, quercetin and kaempferol.
– Latex of fresh unripe fruits yielded b-amyrin, lupeol, a-amyrin, b-sitosterol and b-sitosterol–3-O-b-D-glucoside, in addition to a phenolic glucoside 2,4,6-trihydroxy benzophenone-2-O-b-D-glucopyranoside.
– Hexane and ethyl acetate extracts yielded a mixture of phytosterols and triterpenoids, lanosterol, B-sitosterol, stigmasterol, campesterol, friedelin, lupeol, ursolic acid, and B-amyrin.

Indian rubber vine4

Properties
Plant considered an irritant and poisonous.
Leaves are toxic.

Parts used
Leaves

Uses 
Folkloric
– No reported folkloric medicinal use in the Philippines.
– In Madagascar, reportedly used for criminal purposes and against vermin.
– Powdered leaves, mixed with water, when swallowed can cause persistent vomiting after half an hour; death in 15 hours.

Indian rubber vine5
Study Findings
• Antiviral: In a study of medicinal plants for its antiviral activity, Cryptostegia grandiflora showed partial activity at higher concentraions.
• Cardiac glycosides: Study of the leaves of C. grandiflora yielded four news cardiac glycosides: crptostigmin I to IV together with two known cardenolides.
• Antibacterial: Study of the different extracts of Cryptostegia grandiflora was done for antibacterial potential against Pseudomonas cepacia, B megatorim, S aureus, E coli B subtilis. Almost all extracts produced significant antibacterial activity against all the microorganisms, comparable to standard antibiotic tetracycline hydrochloride. The petroleum ether extract showed maximum efficacy.
• Latex Pro-Inflammatory Activity: Study investigating the pro-inflammatory activity of the latex of C grandifolia was investigated. Results showed the soluble proteins of the latex induced strong inflammatory activity, enlarged vascular permeability and increased myeloperoxidase acticvity locally in rats. It concludes that the latex of CG is a potent inflammatory fluid and implicates lactifer proteins in that activity.
• Antimicrobial: Study isolated compounds from hexane and ethyl acetate extracts isolated a mixtures of phytosterols and triterpenoids. Lanosterol, a triterpenoid, was most active against E. coli and campesterol had greater activity against Candida albicans.

Availability
Wild-crafted.