Lingaro

Family • Elaeagnaceae - Elaeagnus philippensis Perr.

Scientific names

Elaeagnus philippensis Perr.
Elaeagnus angustifolia Blanco
Elaeagnus cumingii Schlecht.
Elaeagnus alingaro Schlecht.
Elaeagnus latifolia Miq.

Common names

Alingaro (Tag.)
Alunut (Iv.)
Bantap (Sul.)
Banaken (Bon.)
Kopapei (Ig.)
Lagot (Buk.)
Lingaro (Tag.)
Malaimus (P. Bis.)
Padias (Ig.)

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Botany
Lingaro is a straggling or climbing shrub with long branches which are covered with minute, brown scales. Leaves are entire, subelliptic to ovately oblong, 4 to 9 centimeters long, 2 to 4 centimeters wide, pointed at both ends or blunt at the base, shining and dark green above, and coppery or sometimes grayish-white beneath. Flowers are yellow, occurring singly in the axils of the leaves. Fruit is oval, about 1.5 to 3 centimeters long, pale red or pinkish, sweet and juicy when ripe.

Lingaro

Distribution
– In thickets and forests at low and medium altitudes, ascending to 1,500 meters throughout the Philippines.
– Sometimes cultivated as an ornamental or for its edible fruit.

Properties
Flowers are astringent and cardiac.

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Parts used
Flowers, fruit.

Uses
Edibility / Culinary
– Fruit can be eaten raw. Also, makes a fine jam, jelly, and preserve.

Folkloric
– Ripe fruit given to children suffering with amoebic dysentery.
– Flowers are astringent and cardiac.

Study Findings
• No studies reported.

Availability
Wild-crafted.