Sapnit

Family • Leguminosae / Fabaceae - Caesalpinia latisiliqua (Cav.) Hattink


Scientific names

Caesalpinia latisiliqua (Cav.) Hattink
Caesalpinia torquata Blanco
Mezoneurum procumbens Blanco
Mezoneuron latisiliquum (Cav.) Merr.
Mezoneuron rubrum Merr.
Mezoneuron glabrum sensu Fern.-Vill.
Bauhinia latisiliqua Cav.

Common names

Arayat (Ilk.)
Dauag (Tag.)
Dauer (Ilk.)
Kabit-kabag (Tag.)
Kamit-kabag (Tag.)
Kamot-pusa (Tag., Pamp.)
Sabit (Ig.)
Sagnit (Tag.)
Sampinit (Tag., Mbo.)
Sapinit (P. Bis.)
Sapnit (Tag., Pamp.)
Siit (Bis.)
Sokit (Yak.)
Tugabang (Bis.)
Ugabang (Bis.)

Sapnit2

Sapnit

Botany
Sapnit is a tall tree climber. Leaves are evenly bipinnate, about 30 centimeters long (more or less), and smooth, the rachis provided with a pair of recurved hooks from the base of the secondary rachises. Leaflets are elliptically oblong, 1.8 to 4 centimeters long and 1 to 1.5 centimeters wide, with truncate or retuse tip. Inflorescence is terminal, smooth, and 50 to 60 centimeters long. Calyx is glaucous, green, very broad, and obscurely lobed. Petals are greenish, and exceeding the calyx in length. Pods are 10 to 18 centimeters long and 3 to 4.5 centimeters wide, obtuse at both ends, winged along the dorsal edge, and compressed, and contain several red seeds.

Sapnit3

Distribution
– In thickets and secondary forests at low and medium altitudes throughout the Philippines.
– Also reported in Timor.

Parts used
Leaves.

Uses
Edibility
In the Philippines, young shoots eaten as salad.
Folkloric
Decoction of leaves given to relieve asthma.

Study Findings
• No studies found.

Availability
Wild-crafted.