Tangisang-bayauak

Family • Moraceae - Ficus variegata Blume - RED-STEM FIG - Za se rong

Scientific names

Ficus variegata Blume
Ficus chlorocarpa Benth [illegitimate]
Ficus ehretioides F.Muell ex Benth.
Ficus integrifolia Elmer
Ficus laevigata Blanco [illegitimate]
Ficus latsoni Elmer
Ficus subracemosa Blume
Ficus tenimbrensis S.Moore

Other vernacular names

CHINESE: Za se rong.

Common names

Agi (Yak.)
Banakal (Bag.)
Basikong (Bag.)
Duoyog (P. Bis.)
Dudang (Sul.)
Dudu (Ig.)
Laptai (Tag.)
Lapting (Ilk.)
Ligtug (Bon.)
Lita (Ibn.)
Payahan (Sbl.)
Rayaraya (Tag.)
Tabgon (Bik.)
Tañgisang-bayauak (Sbl.,Tag.)
Tubol (Pang.)
Common red stem fig (Engl.)
Red stem fig (Engl.)
Variegated fig (Engl.)
Variegated rubber plant (Engl.)

Tangisang-bayauak

Additional Sources and Suggested Readings

(1) Herbal medicines used to cure various ailments by the inhabitants of Abbottabad district, North West Frontier Province, Pakistan / Arshad Mehmood Abbasi, Mir Ajab Khan et al / Indian Journ of Traditional Knowledge, Vol 9(1), January 2010, pp 175-183

(2) Ficus variegata Blume is an accepted name / The Plant List

Botany
Tangisang-bayauak is a tall, spreading tree, with pale bark. Leaves are broadly or elliptic-ovate, 10 to 17 centimeters long, the base rounded, notched or heart-shaped and the tip tapering to a point, with the margins entire, subexpanded or toothed. Receptacles are about 1 centimeter in diameter, red when ripe, and clustered on long branches.

Tangisang-bayauak4

Tangisang-bayauak2

Distribution
– Common in primary forests at low and medium altitudes from Cagayan to Sorsogon in Luzon, in Palawan and Mindanao.
– Also occurs in the Malay Peninsula and Archipelago and in southern China.

Constituents
– Various dried bark extracts yielded sugar, protein, alkaloids, flavonoids, sterols, and glycosides.

Tangisang-bayauak3

Tangisang-bayauak5

Parts used
Leaves, bark, latex.

Uses
Culinary
– In Java the young shoot-tips and young fruits are eaten raw or cooked.
Folkloric
– In the Philippines fresh leaves are applied as topical in boils.
– In Malaya, the bark, reportedly sweet, is chewed or used in decoction for dysentery.
– Latex of the bark used as a coat over wounds.
– In Pakistan, paste prepared from fresh milky juice of the plant mixed with milk is applied to boils and affected skin three times daily.

Study Findings
• No studies found.

Availability
Wild-crafted.